[ Ø ] Harsh Prakash – GIS Blog

Quiet Musings On Applied Spatial (Health, Disaster, Technology, Planning et al.)

Archive for the ‘Web’ Category

Mashup on iPad

with 7 comments

OK, so tested Google, Bing, Yahoo, ESRI, Openlayers and MapServer mashups on the iPad, and much like on the iPhone, the slippy drag-and-droll interface doesn’t work. Except for one mashup. Take a guess?

Related:
* Safari
* WebKit

Written by Harsh

April 15th, 2010 at 10:50 pm

Taking Wolfram|Alpha on an Alpha Run

without comments

Wolfram|Alpha is being billed as an Answer Engine for the scientifically-minded, as opposed to a Search Engine: It takes your query, implied or otherwise, that critical step further by selecting from its list of matches, the one objective description, image etc, and lays them out in context. Not that Google never attempts definitive answers [chord], but when it does, Wolfram|Alpha [note] handily beats it to it with background information. START, on the other hand, is sometimes embarrassing. Note that it may not know what to do, but it does not give the wrong answer. Yet.

So Wolfram|Alpha dares to do more than say, Google or Yahoo or Microsoft, and impresses despite its alpha status.

There are inherent risks in such an approach in that it hopes our queries are frequently specific enough, which in some cases, will not be because that is how we generally are. There is also that small issue of assigning culpability to its user for a dumb query. But through consistent performance and by avoiding curation, link-fraud etc pitfalls, Wolfram|Alpha has the potential to wean away some of the Google fan-base, notwithstanding Google Squared. And by targeting the scientific community, it has the potential to emerge as a niche Answer Engine despite semantic ambiguity or crowd-sourcing.

Bookmark it now. And keep checking.

Here are some stumpers:
* What is the elevation above sea level at 38.889483,-77.035254? Wolfram|Alpha v Google v START
* What was the annual revenue of the state of Maryland for Fiscal Year 2007?
Wolfram|Alpha v Google v START
* What is the maximum height of the Guggenheim Museum NY? Wolfram|Alpha v Google v START
* How many symphonies did Sergei Rachmaninoff compose? Wolfram|Alpha v Google v START

Related:
* Developers

Written by Harsh

May 17th, 2009 at 7:52 pm

b2evolution 2 wordpress

with 3 comments

Well, I have switched from b2evolution to WordPress CMS. And thanks to Apache’s mod_rewrite, I was able to keep all my old links intact. Here’s how:

### wordpress:
<IfModule mod_rewrite.c>
# basic:
RewriteEngine On
RewriteBase /gistools/discuss/weblogs/blogs/
# file:
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
# dir:
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteRule . /gistools/discuss/weblogs/blogs/index.php [L]
# [R] Redirect [L] Last rule
# post:
Options +FollowSymLinks
RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} title=([^&]+)
RewriteRule ^index\.php /gistools/discuss/weblogs/blogs/%1\.html? [r=301,nc]
# archive – monthly:
http://www.spatiallink.org/gistools/discuss/weblogs/blogs/pi.php?m=200807
RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} m=([0-9]{4})([0-9]{2})
RewriteRule ^index\.php /gistools/discuss/weblogs/blogs/%1/%2? [r=301,nc]
# archive – category:
RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} cat=15
RewriteRule ^index\.php /blog/category/aspatial [r=301,nc]
RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} cat=14
RewriteRule ^index\.php /blog/category/spatial [r=301,nc]
</IfModule>
### end wordpress

This was how the old URL looked like, http://www.spatiallink.org/gistools/discuss/weblogs/blogs/?title=gisp_and_aicp. Note that there were limitations to permalink, since %year%, %day% or %category% were unknown from the old URL. Fortunately, I had only 2 categories, so this was a cinch.

Written by Harsh

July 28th, 2008 at 11:22 pm

Follow Up [2]: Debating Net Neutrality: A Nutshell

without comments

Quotes from the recent Net Neutrality Hearings:

David L. Cohen, Vice-President, Comcast– ‘…on a “very limited basis” Comcast was delaying traffic in limited areas when there is heavy traffic.'”Don’t let the rhetoric of some of the critics scare you- there is nothing wrong with network management. Every network is managed.”

Tim Wu, Professor, Columbia Law School– “I have this terrible fear we are going to have an exam after this on what is reasonable network management. And we are all going to fail.”

Related:
FCC to Act on Delaying of Broadband Traffic [NYT]
FCC
Network Management

Written by Harsh

February 25th, 2008 at 8:34 pm

Posted in Social,Technology,Web

Tagged with , , ,

2008

without comments

I started the year with thisTime Management‘ video by Randy Pausch. You may know him from ‘The Last Lecture‘. His introduction is by Gabe– my website mentor at UVA Computer Science Web Team. A must-watch if you haven’t already.

— π

Related:
2007
The Legacy of Randy Pausch

Written by Harsh

January 31st, 2008 at 9:35 pm

Posted in Technology,Web

Tagged with ,

The Power of Ten

without comments

1,000 CONTACTS > 100 VISITORS > 10 SIGN-UPS > 1 ACTIVE USER

Medium Maximization: “A medium, for example, points or money, is a token people receive as the immediate reward of their effort. It has no value in and of itself, but it can be traded for a desired outcome. Experiments demonstrate that, when people are faced with options entailing different outcomes, the presence of a medium can alter what option they choose. This effect occurs because the medium presents an illusion of advantage to an otherwise not so advantageous option, an illusion of certainty to an otherwise uncertain option, or an illusion of linearity to an otherwise concave effort-outcome return relationship. This work has implications for how points influence consumer choice and how money influences human behavior.”

• “With the lure of points added to the mix, more than half of students chose the longer task and the less desirable pistachio prize that went with it. Independent of their actual value, ‘points’ apparently give people some satisfaction. That’s just one reason that frequent-flier programs have been so successful for so long.” [NYT]

Related:
* “It is claimed that a satisfied customer tells an average of three people about a product or service he/she likes, and eleven people about a product or service which he/she did not like [Silverman, George. Secrets of Word Of Mouth Marketing. 2001]. Viral marketing is based on this natural human behavior.
* Bizsum Book Summary [Amazon]

Written by Harsh

December 28th, 2007 at 7:20 pm

Posted in Technology,Web

Tagged with , ,

Follow Up [1]: Never the Twain Shall Meet

without comments

Written by Harsh

November 21st, 2007 at 6:30 pm

Posted in Technology,Web

Tagged with ,

Mobile Browsers

without comments

As the Google-backed Open Handset Alliance takes shape, I have been testing dominant WAP browsers on my 2-year old touchscreen PocketPC. This resulting post should narrow down the choices for those who follow:

• Deep Fish by Microsoft appears to be the most promising of the lot. Unfortunately, it is in a strict testing phase and no longer accepting registrations. Until then, you can always make do with Internet Explorer for Mobile.
• Opera, arguably the slimmest desktop browser out there, has a paid version- Opera Mobile for $24. But if you do not have a smartphone and/or do not wish to spend any money, try Opera Mini.
• The Mozilla Foundation has the amusingly named Minimo.

Opera Mobile offers tab-browsing like Minimo, and does a better job at handling pop-ups and javascripts than Internet Explorer. And like Minimo, it offers ‘grab and drag’ navigation thus eliminating scrollbars. Opera Mobile also offers subtle other improvements, like allowing you to change your User Agent- a must-have for those websites that recognize mobile browsers, but remain inexplicably unprepared for them. On the other hand, Minimo features XUL [try this in Firefox – chrome://browser/content/browser.xul] that has impressively found its way into Mozilla Amazon Browser etc, and is the most customizable.

Absent from all these is the Nokia Web Browser– the sometime favorite of opensource mobile development. After all, its early emulators are what helped a lot of programmers/developers gain a handle on mobile development long before Google.

–π

Related:
• Follow Up [1]: Wireless Application Protocol
• Wanted: Proactive Policies
• >> WAP
• News:: Spatial
• News:: Science & Technology
• Sample *.xul
• xda-developers Forum
• Picsel Browser
• Zumobi
• Proxy Server
• Mini-Me

Written by Harsh

November 13th, 2007 at 7:22 pm

Posted in LBS,Web

Tagged with , ,

A Tale of Two Languages

with 2 comments

Try this page to compare Ruby‘s and Python‘s language elegance side-by-side. Spoiler Warning: There is a winner!

To get you started:
Ruby – string.method [“String”.reverse or “String”.length]
Python – string[slice] or function(string) [“String”[::-1] or len(“String”)]

–π

Related:
• Python Interpreter
• ASP
• Cold Fusion
• JSP
• Perl [ActivePerl]
• [ActivePython]
• PHP
• Tcl [ActiveTcl]
• A Tale of Two Cities

Written by Harsh

November 11th, 2007 at 10:36 pm

Posted in Programming,Web

Tagged with ,

Follow Up [1]: Debating Net Neutrality: A Nutshell

without comments

Written by Harsh

June 24th, 2007 at 4:30 am

Posted in Technology,Web

Tagged with , , ,

Debating Net Neutrality: A Nutshell

without comments

–π

Related:
• [my comment]
The Coming Internet Traffic Jam: “…argument on government legislation. It is a false argument that some proponents of non-neutrality wish to spread. Surely, in this age of war-profiteers turning in record-breaking quarters, loose monopolies of mergers and bundles, debatable price gouging etc, it is a little naive to want to believe that all the companies involved will tow some good line on the other side of short-term profits for the greater common good.

If anything, some private companies interfere with day-to-day governance through unabashed lobbying and kickback offerings, creating grossly unfair access to government.

If a government legislation has caused long-term damage in the past, the legislation must be refined or redone and the legislators should be unelected, not have the people’s say through ‘smart legislation’ be silenced.”
[/my comment]
• Making Public Policy: A Nutshell
• Wanted: Proactive Policies

Written by Harsh

May 13th, 2007 at 11:05 pm

Posted in Technology,Web

Tagged with , , ,

2006

without comments

Here are four “events” from 2006 that I consider as evolutionary milestones of our burgeoning SIS industry:

• E2– ESRI finally catches up to GE. Almost
• Virtual Earth– Microsoft adds the ability to add and save shapes, and browser-based GE-esque 3D views
• GE– Google gulps SketchUp and consolidates GE’s usergroups by jumping head-first in collaborations
• Spatial Web Services- Be it ESRI’s ArcWeb Services with GlobeXplorer, or DM Solutions Group‘s MapSherpa Spatial Web Services and Mapgears, spatial web services gain a firmer footing at the enterprise level.

–π

Written by Harsh

December 24th, 2006 at 10:05 pm

Posted in Technology,Web

Tagged with , ,

Top 10 Technology Trends for 2006 [“comment”]

without comments

1. First there were WiFi hotspots, then hot zones [“even more so”]
2. Cell phones do everything [“right-on”]
3. Internet phone calls become more popular now that major Web companies are making it easier [“about time”]
4. The [MS] Office moves to the Web. Documents, e-mail and spreadsheets move off your desktop computer to the Web [“about time”]
5. Stem-cell research advances despite legal challenges [“right-on”]
6. Biotechs target flu vaccines [“right-on, same for other vaccines”]
7. Even small start-ups go global [“even more so”]
8. Video comes to the blog [“refer to 9”]
9. On-demand video everywhere [“refer to 2”]
10. Clean technologies [“even more so”]

More crystal ball gazing:

• A tough year ahead for Sony [“fate deserved, although XBox would probably hurt more”]
• AJAX cleans up the Web [“impressive”]
• Cracks appear in Apple’s iTunes shiny armor [“would take more, but also refer to hymn“]
• Telco companies get ensnared in a domestic eavesdropping scandal [“a very tight-rope”]
• A video search company is acquired by a major player [“iFilm?”]
• Municipal Wi-Fi [“refer to South Korea and Japan“]
• Silicon Photonics [ ~ ‘integrating light with silicon’]
• Social Machines [ ~ ‘social web’]
• Search [“Google“!]
• Feeds [“RSS and podcasting and videos, need I say more?”]

Technology Review

Related:
• Gates on Vista
• Directions Magazine takes a swing

Written by Harsh

January 6th, 2006 at 6:04 pm

Posted in Technology,Web

Tagged with , ,

Memorandum Excerpt, Alleged

without comments

From: Bill Gates
Sent: Sunday, October 30, 2005 9:56 PM
To: Executive Staff and Direct Reports; Distinguished Engineers
Subject: Internet Software Services

“… Ten years ago this December, I wrote a memo entitled The Internet Tidal Wave which described how the internet was going to forever change the landscape of computing… Five years ago we focused our strategy on .NET making a huge bet on XML and web services… We will build our strategies around internet services and we will provide a broad set of service APIs and use them in all of our key applications… This coming ‘services wave’ will be very disruptive… This next generation of the internet is being shaped by its ‘grassroots’ adoption and popularization model, and the cost-effective ‘seamless experiences’ delivered through the intentional fusion of services, software and sometimes hardware… I’ve attached a memo from Ray which I feel sure we will look back on as being as critical as The Internet Tidal Wave memo was when it came out…”

–Bill

PS:
?
From: Ray Ozzie
Date: October 28, 2005
To: Executive Staff and direct reports
Subject: The Internet Services Disruption

“… This isn?t the first time of such great change: we?ve needed to reflect upon our core strategy and direction just about every five years… In 1990, there was actually a question about whether the graphical-user-interface had merit… When we reflected upon our dreams just five years later in 1995, the impetus for our new center of gravity came from the then-nascent web… In 2000, in the waning days of the dot com bubble, we yet again reflected on our strategy and refined our direction… It is now 2005, and the environment has changed yet again- this time around services…

The Landscape:

… In the US, there are more than 100MM broadband users, 190MM mobile phone subscribers, and WiFi networks blanket the urban landscape… We should?ve been leaders with all our web properties in harnessing the potential of AJAX, following our pioneering work in OWA [Outlook Web Access]. We knew search would be important, but through Google?s focus they?ve gained a tremendously strong position. RSS is the internet?s answer to the notification scenarios we?ve discussed and worked on for some time, and is filling a role as ?the UNIX pipe of the internet? as people use it to connect data and systems in unanticipated ways. For all its tremendous innovation and its embracing of HTML and XML, Office is not yet the source of key web data formats- surely not to the level of PDF. While we?ve led with great capabilities in Messenger and Communicator, it was Skype, not us, who made VoIP broadly popular and created a new category. We have long understood the importance of mobile messaging scenarios and have made significant investment in device software, yet only now are we surpassing the Blackberry… The same is true of Apple, which has done an enviable job integrating hardware, software and services into a seamless experience with .Mac, iPod and iTunes, but seems less focused on enabling developers to build substantial products and businesses.

… Only a few years ago I?d have pointed to the Weblog and the Wiki as significant emerging trends; by now they?re mainstream and have moved into the enterprise. Flickr and others have done innovative work around community sharing and tagging based on simple data formats and metadata. GoToMyPC and GoToMeeting are very popular low-end solutions to remote PC access and online meetings… VoIP seems on the verge of exploding- not just in Skype, but also as indicated by things such as the Asterisk soft-PBX. Innovations abound from small developers- from RAD frameworks to lightweight project management services and solutions…

Key Tenets:

… 1. The power of the advertising-supported economic model… 2. The effectiveness of a new delivery and adoption model… 3. The demand for compelling, integrated user experiences that ‘just work’…

The Opportunities:

Seamless OS… Seamless Communications… Seamless Productivity… Seamless Entertainment… Seamless Marketplace… Seamless Solutions… Seamless IT…

Moving Forward:

… Platform Products and Services Division- a. Base v. Additive Experiences… b. Services Platform… c. Service/Server Synergy… d. Lightweight Development- The rapid growth of application assembly using things such as REST, JavaScript and PHP suggests that many developers gravitate toward very rapid, lightweight ways to create and compose solutions. We have always appreciated the need for lightweight development by power users in the form of products such as Access and SharePoint… e. Responsible Competition…

Business Division- a. Connected Office… Should PowerPoint directly ?broadcast to the web?, or let the audience take notes and respond?… b. Telecom Transformation… c. Rapid Solutions- How can we utilize our extant products and our knowledge of the broad historical adoption of forms-based applications to jump-start an effort that could dramatically surpass offerings from Quickbase to Salesforce.com?…

Entertainment and Devices Division- a. Connected Entertainment… b. Grassroots Mobile Services… c. Device/Service Fusion…

What’s Different?:

… Complexity kills… Another simple tool I?ve used involves attracting developers to use common physical workspaces to naturally catalyze ad hoc face-time between those who need to coordinate, rather than relying solely upon meetings and streams of email and document reviews for such interaction…”

–Ray

Related:
* “Building a Better Boom: …The Internet is exciting again, and once again folks are rushing in. In some categories – like search or social networking, for example – there are scores of start-ups vying for pretty much the same market, and it’s certain that, just like last time, most of them will fail.

But regardless of all this déjà vu, we are not in a bubble. Instead we are witnessing the Web’s second coming, and it’s even got a name- ‘Web 2.0’, although exactly what that moniker stands for is the topic of debate in the technology industry. For most it signifies a new way of starting and running companies – with less capital, more focus on the customer and a far more open business model when it comes to working with others. Archetypal Web 2.0 companies include Flickr– a photo sharing site; Bloglines– a blog reading service; and MySpace– a music and social networking site…

Start-ups are leveraging nearly a decade’s worth of work on technologies that are now not only proven, but also free, or very nearly so. Open-source software can now do nearly everything that Oracle, I.B.M. and Microsoft specialized in back in the 90’s. And the cost of computing and bandwidth? You can now lease a platform that can handle millions of customers for less than $500 a month. In the 90’s, such a platform would have run tens of thousands of dollars or more a month…

Or just ask Joe Kraus– a founder of the once high-flying Excite portal. Excite ran through millions in venture capital, then tens of millions of I.P.O. money, before its spectacular demise [Mr. Kraus had left before then]. His latest start-up- JotSpot, is built on open-source software, and cost less than $200,000 to begin.

Mr. Kraus exemplifies the second reason I believe we are not in a bubble: this time, the financiers aren’t driving. Instead, the entrepreneurs and geeks – often one and the same – are. The lessons of Web 1.0 are never far from their minds, and the desire to create something cool that might foster some good in the world is often equally paramount with the desire to make money. The culture of Web 2.0 is, in fact, decidedly missionary – from the communitarian ethos of Craigslist to Google‘s informal motto- ‘don’t be evil’.

Ah, yes, Google. That brings us to the third reason we are not in a bubble: vastly improved search technologies. Recall that the demise of Web 1.0 was predicated in large part on the collapse of the Internet advertising business – people were spending millions buying billboard-like ads that, it turns out, nobody was paying attention to…”

John Battelle; Co-producer, Web 2.0 conference; Author, “The Search: How Google and Its Rivals Reinvented Business and Transformed Our Culture”
* “What is Web 2.0”: Design Patterns and Business Models for the Next Generation of Software
* NYT Article
* Memorandum Excerpt, Alleged

Written by Harsh

November 18th, 2005 at 7:01 pm

Posted in Technology,Web

Tagged with ,

Links

without comments

It’s time to move these to del.icio.us:

• http://labs.google.com/ Google’s showcase
• http://next.yahoo.com/ Yahoo’s showcase
• http://research.microsoft.com/ Microsoft Research

• http://geoportal.kgs.ku.edu/googlemaps/ks_gm.cfm SDE+GMap
• http://traffic.poly9.com/ Traffic, weather and news glues for Google Maps

• http://opensource.nokia.com/ Nokia in opensource WAP

• http://www.webstyleguide.com/ Web style guide
• http://jibbering.com/faq/ comp.lang.javascript FAQ

• http://robin.sourceforge.net/ Browser-based desktop
• http://www.writely.com/ Browser-based word processor
• http://www.ktdms.com/ Document management system
• http://www.openfiler.org/ Browser-based network storage software distribution
• http://www.debugmode.com/wink/ Tutorial and presentation creation software

• http://www.lexisnexis.com/sourcelists/ Legal and public records
• http://www.issues2000.org/ Candidates on issues

• http://senseable.mit.edu/grazrealtime/ Mobile Landscape
• http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2005/10/08/tech/main927858.shtml “Could cell phones stop traffic?”

–π

Written by Harsh

November 7th, 2005 at 6:02 pm

Posted in GIS,Web

Tagged with , ,

Never the Twain Shall Meet

without comments

On the eve of the launch of Virtual Earth, as Microsoft plays catch-up with Google‘s high-rate of innovation, here’s a transcript of some tete-a-tete:

[Sometime before 2000]
Bill Gates: Now that we are in the email business with Hotmail, we need to think of ways to fatten the bottom-line.
Steve Ballmer: Online marketing is the way to go Bill! Let’s just create ahem ahem unnecessary page-views when the user logs-in and put as many graphic-intensive ads on each one of them as possible.
Bill Gates: …something like that SNL skit about advertisements on MSNBC flooding the screen and blocking the anchor’s face?!
Steve Ballmer: …hehehe, something like that! Hey, it’s a free service- the user might as well pay for it through ad views. You’ve got to market these goodies aggressively!
Bill Gates: Yeah, the bottom-line is the key!

[Sometime before 2004]
Larry Page: We need to get into the email business with a Google mail. The current services aren’t up to par.
Sergey Brin: Yeah, but given our relative size we must offer something that is significantly superior to what the market currently offers to make any reasonable in-roads.
Larry Page: OK, let’s start with a clean slate- how do we offer a better email service?
Sergey Brin: It’s all about the user-experience. At the end, if the user likes it, she will come back for more.
Larry Page: So we don’t flood the page with pop-ups and such junk??
Sergey Brin: That’s right! Advertisements should be useful but as unobtrusive as possible.
Larry Page: Agreed, the user-experience is the key!

Related:
• Follow Up [2]: Map Viewer and Google

–π

PS:
• Rudyard Kipling

Written by Harsh

July 24th, 2005 at 7:37 pm

Posted in Technology,Web

Tagged with ,

WIKI: Edit Lock Schema

with 3 comments

Now that I would update the DFIRM WIKI more frequently, I added a lock this past weekend to prevent simultaneous editing. And after being hit by abuse through automated comments, basic verification was also added while still allowing relatively hassle-free editing.
Pi: Quiet Musing
At some point, I may submit these improvements back to TipiWiki.

–π

Written by Harsh

June 17th, 2005 at 7:34 pm

Posted in Programming,Web

Tagged with , , ,

Half-life of a Webpage

without comments

The primary objective of this blog is to mull over industry trends and abstract ideas relevant to the profession, not to regurgitate “operational details”. However, this post may bend that rule.

For those not in the know, a webpage does a lot of behind-the-scene work before it spits-out text on the screen. Here’s a summary of what this webpage does:

• The very first thing it does is send out a header depending on the client-browser. This is recommended when, say, different protocols are used to access the webpage. Note that this step gets initiated only after the Apache Webserver has finished running through its configuration directives. The webpage then marks the start-time for script download and execution. Measuring script download and execution time helps in diagnostics. The webpage also goes down a list of red-flags checking for browser compatibility and permission-settings. Later, it establishes connections with MySQL databases and fetches or defines client and script variables.

• Only then does the layout begin to emerge with some CSS, XHTML and plenty of include files. Care is taken to separate presentation which has been kept to a minimum given the volunteer nature of the website, from content and function, and make it easier to reuse data. To display news feeds, as is the case here, the webpage fetches the feed URL and slices its content into nodes. Sometimes feed URLs do not provide information as desired. For example, this feed URL does not provide a direct hyperlink to its article. Sometimes a feed URL includes an image-path in its description that needs to be dropped. For such cases, scripting languages like PHP offer a wide-array of string-manipulation functions. It is advisable to ensure that the webpage continues to get parsed in a timely manner even if the fetching fails.

• The webpage then wraps-up logging of relevant variables and closes open database connections. If script execution has generated any errors, a summary gets emailed to the administrator. The webpage then spits-out the footer. Its decay into dead text is finally complete […well, unless you use AJAX to monitor client-behavior, as is the case here].

• A quick note on the website maintenance: Given its volunteer nature, it is maintained in small nudges i.e. “minor increments made frequently”, with the emphasis being on function over form.

Related:
• World Wide Web Consortium
• Web Style Guide
• Interesting Website
  º http://www.nyas.org/
  º http://news.google.com/
  º http://www.cancer.gov/
  º http://www.nobodyhere.com/
• Website Theme: A lot of experiences came together to start and shape the evolving theme of this website- During the 2002 Colorado/Arizona wildfire disaster, I received an email from the FGDC list serve requesting volunteers for assistance; Then at the 2003 ESRI Annual Conference, I learnt how volunteering is not easy- how the volunteer is not always in control; The omnipresence of mature opensource software not getting enough attention from the general public was a cause for concern; Also, a need was felt to enhance the functionality of my cellphone by connecting it with custom online applications; Additionally, there was a personal need to digest vast amounts of professional information from anywhere.

–π

Written by Harsh

May 8th, 2005 at 10:55 pm

Posted in Programming,Web

Tagged with ,

ArcIMS FAQs

without comments

I have also added this post to this Wiki, in case you want to expound and guide those who follow – The post just helps me ensure the data doesn’t get spammed-out that easily:

  • I am getting a ‘jsForm.htm not found’ error? If you are using Internet Explorer, first make sure you have the latest version of that browser. Then remove the Arcims site from your browser favorites, reopen the browser and try again.

  • How do I import Arcims maps inside ESRI Arcmap? If you have Arcmap 9.x, you can import Arcims maps by connecting to the services of an Arcims server. In Arccatalog 9.x, simply click on ‘GIS Servers’ to add the Arcims server and type-in its URL. Note that this does lead to a noticeable performance drop.

  • How do I accurately rescale the map when that functionality is provided? True scale depends on monitor resolution, the default being 96 DPI (Dots Per Inch). To make sure that your monitor is configured correctly, for MS Windows, check Display Properties–>Settings–>Advanced–>General. Note that when the map is rescaled to, say 1:12000, 1 inch on the map should represent 12,000 inches. Also note that you can use the Esc button on your keyboard to stop the map from rescaling at any time. Refer to Map Scales for related information.

  • I click on the print button but nothing happens? Make sure pop-ups are allowed for your Arcims site, then try the Print Tool again.

Related:
* ESRI Support
* WIKI: Edit Lock Schema

Written by Harsh

January 6th, 2005 at 1:43 pm

Posted in Education,GIS,IMS,Technology,Web

Tagged with , ,