[ Ø ] Harsh Prakash – GIS Blog

Quiet Musings On Applied Spatial (Health, Disaster, Technology, Planning et al.)

Archive for the ‘GIS’ tag

How We Balanced Proprietary With Opensource Software And Saved Tax Dollars, And You Can Too

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It all began with a question – “Can we do with out?”.

GIS@NIH

Enterprise Architecture > Technology Architecture > Geographic Information System (GIS):
* Geographic Information System (GIS) Pattern
* GIS Desktop Brick
* GIS Virtual Globe Brick
* GIS IMS Brick
* GIS Web Service Brick

Related:
* GIS Market Study of Internet Mapping Server (IMS) – Summary – Requirements and Comparison Matrix (2006)

Meanwhile, Thirteen Years Later…

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So, does it hold up?

The Map (GIS Growth Study) v. The Thing Mapped (Demographics, Plan)

PS: I smell a decentralist –

“A Caveat (from 2001)

Such a planning methodology of data collection and projection does have some intrinsic faults: it relies heavily on knowledge-based skills. It assumes that ‘correct solutions’ to social problems can be obtained from a scientific analysis of various data. It must be noted that a solution-driven approach and heavy reliance on physical sciences as opposed to social sciences, is inherently inaccurate since the ‘best planning answer’ is a non-existent variable, changing with time, society, culture, resource availability, etc. And there is always a danger of being consumed by this technique, and confusing the result for a solution.

The nature of this study involved making some basic assumptions about the way our study-area could evolve in the not-so-distant future. There have been doubts raised about the correctness of such a clinical technique wherein an urban settlement is ‘stripped’ of its various attributes, and these attributes then individually graded. Appreciation of the intricate complexity of human society, where each individual is a separate factor, is absent. Lack of importance to these inter-relationships is a flaw of such an analysis.

For E.g. In the current study, if we were to discover one other attribute, say a desert, how would it affect the final map? We would, using this approach, simply grade each cell one more time. Then we would add this new map to our list of maps, and calculate the new final map. However, we would fail to evaluate how the addition of a desert affects each of the other attributes individually.

But this flaw may not be as aggravated as it seems. Each cell gains its final value from all attributes. If in a hypothetical case, one could gather a ‘complete list of attributes’ that would impact future growth, and assign them ‘correct values’ (without even breaking them into distance-bands which are only for convenience), finally adding them in the ‘right equation’, one would come up with a case-specific fairly accurate growth forecast (however, even then, any sudden future changes would still get missed).

There have also been some other approximations:

* The integer weights assigned to attributes.

* Or, areas outside the study-area that exert significant impact on urban growth, but were ignored because of study limitations.

* Also, on examining the Cultural Points table, it is found that Cemetery was included as a row category. Cultural Points have been considered as having positive influence on future growth. But a cemetery would not have an entirely positive influence on urban growth. Furthermore, parts of UVA were used as cultural points. The university was also used as a major employer. Thus, there has been some overlapping. This results in disproportionate values for some cells.

But this study is an illustration more of a proactive planning approach, than an accurate projection of urban growth for an area. And even though limited in its effectiveness, any attempt to administer planning remedies would have to include some such non-arbitrary problem-solving technique.”

Conference Presentation: GIS TECH 201 – Mapping Mashups

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New Media

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Written by Harsh

June 25th, 2011 at 12:28 pm

Webinar Series: GIS TECH 101 – Mapping Mashups

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Interview: “Geographic Information Systems (GIS) – It’s Much More Than Google Maps – A Chat With GIS Experts”

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Written by Harsh

March 18th, 2010 at 9:27 am

GISP and AICP

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Although I am still on the fence on GISP given the relative lackluster, what APA has done with AICP‘s CM could give it some shine when it comes to creating a provider ecosystem.

To quickly fill you in: Last year at its Leadership Meetings, APA launched the CM program for AICP. In short, it required professional planners to continuously seek training in order to maintain their certifications, and allowed 3rd-party providers to offer that training.

For SIS, adopting a similar approach would require forsaking a fee-centric approach, letting someone like OGC bite a bigger share and sinking deeper into some sort of GIS accreditation, far beyond ESRI Authorized Training Program, before the “Surveyor Usurp” (see below).

–π

Related:
The Status of Professional Certification in GIS – Conclusion:
“GIS application areas range from engineering to computer and information sciences, geography, business, logistics, forestry, and many other academic and professional preparation fields. Because GIS professionals come from a wide variety of backgrounds and academic preparation, no one group can claim to represent all approaches and applications within the GIS community. Also, given the volatile nature of the field, and the rapid change currently underway in software development and application deployment, adequate preparation today does not guarantee competency in the future. For these reasons, an overarching program to ensure appropriate professional preparation and competency must be developed by those parties interested in safeguarding the viability of the field and the competency of those claiming professional status.

It is unlikely that voluntary certification can assure competency across the profession if most practitioners choose not to be certified or if employers don’t insist that their employees be certified. Therefore, it is essential that benefits of certification be clearly articulated. By including a wide range of professional organizations within the certification development process, and working to include the interests of all GIS professionals by developing both a reasonable core set of competencies and appropriate specialized evaluations within the certification process, all groups will benefit from certification.”

� Groups – “The Usurp“: Spatial Sciences Institute (SSI), Australia and Board of Surveying and Spatial Information, New South Wales, Australia

� Degrees: University of Southern Queensland, Australia – Bachelor of Spatial Science (BSPS) and Bachelor of Spatial Science Technology (BSST)

� Ideas: For ideas on what required trainings could entail, here’re some courses (article) and my GIS suggestions for AICP’s CM:

— PLAN TECH 101 – Desktop GIS (vendor-neutral) —
Featuring:
– QGIS (opensource)
– ArcGIS (proprietary, $)
– MapInfo (proprietary, $)
Outline:
* Intro to GIS data
– Vector
– Raster
– KML, GML, WMS etc
* How to acquire GIS data – Resources
* How to work with maps – Common tasks
– Geocoding/Geoprocessing
– Spatial analyses
– Editing
– Printing, publishing
* Intro to spatial databases
* Best practices
* What lies ahead – Industry trends
* Other notable resources – handy tools and hacks

— PLAN TECH 102 – webGIS (vendor-neutral) —
Featuring:
– Mash-Up APIs
– Google Maps (proprietary, free)
– ArcWebServices (proprietary, $)
– Virtual Globes
– NASA World Wind (opensource)
– Google Earth and SketchUp (proprietary, free versions)
– IMS
– MapServer (opensource)
Outline:
* Intro to webGIS
* How to mash-up
– Text to maps etc
– How to use MapMaker, MyMaps and Charts
– License considerations
* How to use Virtual Globes
– How to add placemarks, polygons, photographs etc
– How to georeference photographs
– How to create network links
– How to create tours
– License considerations
– Other presentation considerations
– 3D models
* Intro to in-house interactive mapping
– How to set-up and serve
* Best practices
* What lies ahead – Industry trends
* Other notable resources – handy tools and hacks

— PLAN TECH 103 – Web 2.0 (vendor-neutral) —
Outline:
* Intro to Web 2.0
* How to set-up
– CMSs
– Blogs and forums
– Mailing lists
– webGIS
– Mash-Ups
* How to use Social Networking
– YouTube
– MySpace
– Facebook
* License considerations
* Intro to Section 508
– Guidelines
– Resources
– Tips
* Best practices
* What lies ahead – Industry trends
* Other notable resources – handy tools and hacks

Written by Harsh

July 11th, 2008 at 11:36 pm

Posted in Geography,Planning

Tagged with , , ,